Author: Alcibiades

History of the Great Heathen Army

Introduction: As a result of the dishonorable death of the legendary Viking king Ragnar Lothbrok by the hands of king Aella of Northumbria, his sons had amassed an army, seeking revenge. They waged a war on the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy kingdoms in England, thus ushering in an era of pillage, rape, bloodshed as well as seeing the immigration of Viking settlers on the English Isles and Ireland. Note that the Anglo-Saxons refer to every Nord Viking as a Dane, not to confuse them all being from historical Denmark, as Vikings were from all over Scandinavia. Great Heathen Army: This was...

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History of the Gladiators and The Blood Behind Their Past

Gladiators or swordsmen got their name derived from the sword gladius. They were a form of blood sport entertainment in the Republic of Rome and the Roman Empire. They were people that were conquered by Rome, enslaved and pinned against each other, fighting against beasts to fight to death for the amusement of the cheering crowds. Those crowds as such would gather inside the fighting pits, the arenas, the amphitheatres and the Colosseum itself. Earliest evidence of the existence of gladiators dates back to the colonizing by the Hellenistic tribes settling on the southern side of the Italian peninsula,...

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History of the Medieval Cuisine

The shift in what was consumed commonly throughout Medieval Europe cane in late antiquity and early Medieval ages, as it shifted from meats and dairy products to more wheats, fruits and vegetables. Christianity on Food As Christianity became the dominant religion, via its traditions and various practices restricted to the populace what it would consume during Lent and Advent, permitting only wheat, fruits, vegetables and fish to be consumed during such times. Yet it seems the term fish was loosely based, as it included beavers, ducks, whales and puffins among others. The practice of Lent was not to deter...

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History of the Seljuk Empire

The Seljuk Empire derived its name from Seljuk Beg, the grandparent of the creator of the Seljuk Empire and of the Seljuk dynasty – Tughril Beg. The Seljuk Empire at its height controlled territories ranging from the Caucasus Indicus to western Anatolia and from Central Asia to the Persian Gulf. Beginning and Rapid Growth The empire is noted for uniting what was at that time a crisis in the eastern Islamic world politically and to be of Turko-Persian origins, noted for adopting heavily from the Persian culture, language and traditions. Tughril alongside his brother Chagri struggled to gain power...

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History of the Teutonic Order

Beginning Origins of the Teutonic Order date back to 1190 in Acre, Kingdom of Jerusalem as hospitallers to aid Christians on their way to pilgrimage in the Holy Land. At first they were a small gathering of knights and paid mercenaries serving to protect their hospitals established in Acre and as a crusading army later on during their purging of heresy in pagans in the Baltics. Their motto was “Help, Defend, Heal” and they were recognized for wearing white surcoats bearing a black cross. Their armaments would mirror that of the Knights Templar, bearing the best armor and weapons...

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History of the Varangian Guard and Their Effectiveness

The Varyags of Miklagaard, also more commonly known as the Varangian Guard of Constantinople, were an elite unit that were the personal bodyguards of Byzantine Emperors from the 10th century, until their dissolution in the 14th century A.D. Formation Compromised at first of the Kievan Rus’ ancestors, they would later be of Norsemen origin, of Anglo Saxon as well as of Germanic origin. In service as early as the year 874, the Varangian Guard was formally constituted by Emperor Basil II in 988 A.D after the Christianization of Kievan Rus’ by Vladimir I of Kiev. As Vladimir had acquired...

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The Latin Empire of Constantinople (1204 – 1261)

In June 1203 the crusaders of the 4th crusade attacked the city of Constantinople on request of the Byzantine prince Alexius. Alexus III fled the city and the prince took the throne as Alexus IV along with his blind father Isaac II. After taking the throne it was time to pay up the crusading army what he promised them, but soon Alexus IV ran short of money. Soon he faced an anti-Latin hatred, becoming unpopular and finally he was toppled in a palace coup in January 1204. The crusaders cheated of their reward, declared war on Byzantine and took...

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History of the Kingdom of Aragon

The kingdom of Aragon was a kingdom in northeastern Spain, roughly coextensive with the modern autonomous community of Aragon. The name Aragon comes from the river Aragon which flows by the city of Jaca. The name might be of Bosque origin (Aragona/Haragona- good upper valley), but there is a possibility that the name came from the early Roman province of Hispania. Aragon was a Carolingian feudal state. Later, in the first half of the 9th century it became vassal state of the kingdom of Pamplona (Navarre). The kingdome dates back from 1035, when Sancho III the Great of Navarre...

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The conqueror of Constantinople – Story of Mehmed II Fatih

Mehmed II Fatih (the Conqueror) is born March 30 1432 in Adrianople as the fourth son of Murad II. Little is known for his mother. In latter times she is referred as Huma Hatan and was probably a slave. At the age of 12 he was sent to Manisa (Magnesia) with his two tutors. Mehmed was not the favorite child of his father, since he was restless and difficult to educate. But after his brother was strangled in 1444, Mehmed became the heir and was summoned to Edirne. In the years before Mehmed was send to Edirne, Murad II...

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Prussian Crusade and the Stand for Paganism

As the Polish people were Christianized, and the Kingdom of Poland was established, seeking to conquer the lands that bordered the Baltic Sea, they sought to baptize the pagans inhabiting the territory known as Prussia. Formidable were their adversaries, continuing to effectively repel the attempts to bring them into Christianity. The old Prussians would enslave the Poles of Chelmo Land and Masovia each time they would be invaded. Inviting the Holy Order Plundering, pillaging, raiding, raping and enslaving, were among the deeds condone by the wild pagans that refused to bow to Christianity, a problem so big that the...

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