Author: Alcibiades

History of the Floating City – Republic of Venice

Early history After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, and as the power of Byzantine became weaker in north Italy, the Lombard hordes began incursions in 568. Seeking protection from them, many mainlanders moved on the islands of the lagoon, home only of fishermen and salt workers. The islands of Veneto became part of the exarchate of Ravenna after its creation in 584. Tradition states that Venetians first proclaimed Anafestus Paulicius as duke in 697. However this story can be traced back to the 11th century in the chronicle of John the Deacon. The first historically proven doge...

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The Golden Age of the First Bulgarian Empire- Tsar Simeon I the Great

Nicholas Mystikos, patriarch of the Eastern Church from 901 to 907, and from 912 to 925, in one of the letters addressed to Simeon he writes: “… because you were born from your holy father in time of peace.” He refers to the peace treaty between Bulgaria and Byzantine, which means Simeon is born in 863/864. Not much is known about his childhood. His father wanted to make Simeon a high-ranked cleric in the Bulgaria, so he sent him to school in Constantinople. He learned the Greek language and was raised in a Byzantine spirit. It is not exactly...

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The Man Behind the Blood – The Story of Vlad the Impaler

Early Life Vlad III, son of Vlad Dracul meaning Dragon, was given the nickname Dracula, or Son of the Dragon, the Impaler for his gruesome and sadistic way of executing Ottomans, as well as Dracula, the titular character of Bram Stoker’s novel of the same name that is afflicted by vampirism. He was a voivode or prince of the principality Wallachia that was under rule by the Kingdom of Hungary but was acquired as a suzerainty for the Ottoman Empire that lasted until the 19th century with in between times being occupied by Russia. When he was young, the...

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Kalmar Union – Union Between Norway, Sweden and Denmark

Creation of the union The Hanseatic League, commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns, dominated the economic affairs of the Baltic. The Danish king Valdemar IV tried to break away from the league, but saw that he could not, so he tried to create a new alliance with Norway. He married his daughter Margaret with the Norwegian prince Haakon, later king Haakon VI. In 1370 they had a son, Prince Olaf, who after the death of Valdemar IV in 1376 became king of Denmark as Olaf II with his mother as regent. In 1380 king...

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Mystery Behind the Religion of Rome

Kingdom of Rome: In the early days of antiquity, the Latin tribes of the Italian Peninsula had begun practicing all sorts of festivities and praising numerous deities for a bountiful harvest, ease of mind, as well as sharing a common goal and uniting under, or being conquered by the city state of Rome. Rome itself and its denizens had acquired a lot of the practices from its neighbors, be they traditions, way of speech or the similar deities they praise that would later create their pantheon of gods. Historic sources tell of numerous tales as to how Rome began...

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History of the Mongol Army Roster and Tactics

The Mongol Empire at its zenith was the second largest empire the world has ever known in history; from the Pacific Ocean to Eastern Europe, from Indochina to the Levant, it came to be in a turbulent time in the Medieval Ages, and brought with itself the end of kingdoms and empires. The key thing that allowed the Mongol Empire to quickly spread and conquer was their mobility, as each soldier in the arban, zuun, mingghan and tumen, those being the numerical number of people in military units, were responsible for their own equipment, weapons as well as taking...

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Ancient Egyptian Religion- From Myths to Live After Death

Herodotus wrote in 5th century BC that the Egyptians were one of the most religious people and he was not wrong. The Egyptian religion was a combination of believes and practices which include magic, science, medicine, herbology, mythology, spiritualism, the belief in a higher power and of course, the belief in life after death. During the life on earth, people were expected to uphold the principle of ma’at (it also refers to the goddess Maat or Ma’at, shown holding the feather of truth) or as it known today, harmony. Egyptian Gods The Egyptian religion was polytheistic. The word netjer...

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The Greatest Enemies of Rome

1) Brennus: Described as a particularly warlike tribe, the Senones gave the Republic of Rome quite the trouble culminating in the first Sack of Rome in 390 B.C. Brennus invaded Italy with the intent of sacking Rome, but had met with fierce resistance. They had fought a couple of times on the banks of the rivers Tiber and Allia. Even though he was outmatched two to one, his army of around 15.000 managed to route the republic’s army, and as the vanguard was broken proceeded to sack Rome for a couple of weeks, pillaging, raping and slaughtering its citizens....

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The Story and Formation of the Kingdom of Castile

Castilla, Spanish for Castile, “the land of castles” is first used in about 800 AD for a small area under the Cantabrian Mountains. Castile expanded in the 9th century but remained a collection of counties, whose rulers were nominated by the kings of Asturias and Leon. This all changed in 970 when Fernan Gonzalez united all the counties and became the first count of all Castile. The Beginning Sancho III Garces (the Great) who was already in control of the counties of Aragon, Sobrarbe and Ribagorza, conquered the county of Castile and seized the city of Leon. He took...

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End of an Era – The Fall of The Western Roman Empire

The fall of the Roman Empire in 476 marked the end of the Ancient world and the start of the Middle Ages. When talking about the fall of the Roman Empire, generally it is referred to the fall of the city of Rome in 476, because most of the west was already lost by the middle of the fifth century. The fall of the empire had a huge impact on the world. However the decline and the fall was attributed only to the west, while the east, eventually called Byzantine, continued to exist for many more centuries with a...

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