Author: Admin

What are Some of the Greatest ‘Comebacks’ in Military history?

Imagine this scenario. You, the battlefield, enemies surrounding you, blood everywhere. You are about to lose the war. You are fighting with your last strength. Brothers, friends, sons, everyone you know is fighting for their lives, fighting for the family, for the country. All of this so you can be free. You are trying to help everyone you know, but most of all you are trying to finish the war, the battle, victoriously. You don’t want that blood to be spilled for nothing, so you keep battling. Although you are out of energy and thought that the battle is...

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The Weapons, Armor and Tactics of the Fearsome Huns Which Dominated Europe and Asia

What do we know of the Huns? The Huns first appeared at the end of the fourth century when they attacked barbarian tribes living to the north and west of the Danube. These barbarians then crossed the river and attacked the Roman Empire. They brought with them a style of warfare not entirely unknown to either the barbarians or the Romans, although neither had seen it on such a large scale. This description of the Huns, also from the pen of Ammianus Marcellinus, somewhat distorts the history of the Huns, but it does show the curiosity of the Roman...

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The Strength, Tactics and Meaning of Knights and Knighthood in Europe

The waging of warfare on the European continent at the time of the crusades did not differ from that waged in the Holy Land. All European powers, of any size—including the more central lands of France, England, Italy, and the Holy Roman Empire and the frontier lands of Byzantium, Scandinavia, Scotland, Iberia, Hungary, and the various Baltic and Balkan lands—had adopted cavalry as their primary force by this time. Although the number of horsemen in any army never exceeded the number of infantry, it was the military dominance of the cavalry that formed the tactical, strategic, and chivalric policies...

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The Advancement and Effectiveness of the Late Roman Weapons

Spears and Javelins Throughout most of the history of the Empire, Roman infantry soldiers were characterized by the use of a single weapon, the pilum. The pilum was a heavy spear, used for thrusting or throwing. Pila had a leaf-shaped iron head, 2–3 feet (60–90 centimeters) long, embedded in or socketed onto a wooden shaft with a short iron spike at the rear. Sometimes, especially in the later Roman period, one or two weights would be attached to pila. These tended to increase their power but decrease their range, indicating perhaps a soldier’s preference at those times for a...

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The Berbers, Inhabitants of Northwestern Africa’s Mediterranean coast

The Berbers are the earliest known inhabitants of northwestern Africa’s Mediterranean coast, plains, and mountain ranges. Living as nomadic herders or farmers in Morocco’s Atlas and Rif mountain ranges, Algeria, the Sahara Desert, east into Libya and Egypt, the exact ethnic and cultural origins of the Berbers is unknown, though their languages, called Tamazight, belongs to a family of Afro-Asiatic languages. In ancient times, religions were polytheistic.   From 600 b.c.e. until the fall of the Roman Empire Although ancient Berber history is sketchy because of the fact that there was no written form of their languages, references to them...

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